How to Successfully Adopt a Rabbit

Rabbits make adorable adoptive pets. However, they have some unique characteristics and personality quirks which are important to understand...

Things you need to know before adopting a rabbit

Not only are rabbits super cute, with their little twitchy noses and (sometimes) floppy ears, they can make perfect pets. But, if you’re thinking of adopting a rabbit and bringing it into your home, there are some things you need to keep in mind – both for your sanity and the long and happy life of your new rabbit.

They’re social animals but picky about companions

While rabbits do enjoy the company of other rabbits, you need to be careful about bringing a new rabbit home if you already have one. This is because they can be very picky about who they bond with.

So, if you want to expand your rabbit family, see if you can introduce your current bunny to the potential new one before you commit. Or, if you definitely want more than one bunny, see if your local pet shop or animal shelter has a bonded pair available for adoption.

Whether you have one rabbit or many, it’s important that you spend regular time with them too. After all, isn’t that the point of having a pet? Get down on their level (they’re not fans of being picked up) and play some games with them. This could include obstacle courses, playing with a ball, or even playing chase!

They require special diets

I bet you’re thinking that your rabbit can survive on carrots. Well, think again. While it’s ok to give carrots occasionally as a treat, you should avoid feeding your rabbit most fruits and veggies, as they’re often high in starch, sugar and water, which can play havoc on your rabbit’s digestive system.

When choosing food for your rabbit, the SPCA says it’s safest to stick with hay, leafy greens and high fibre rabbit pellets, and give safe vegetables as a treat.

They make great indoor pets

Rabbits love to romp around, and they should have plenty of space to play in. If you don’t have a lot of outdoor space to house a large run, however, the good news is that – like cats – bunnies can make great indoor pets, and they even can be litter trained!

If you are going to give your rabbit the run of the house, you will need to do some rabbit-proofing. Block off any areas you don’t want your bunny to access, and make sure you keep electrical cords hidden away and out of reach.

It’s also important to check if there are loose bits of carpet or floor- or wall-boarding that may be tempting to your rabbit. They love to dig and chew, so keep this in mind.

Finally, bunnies can live up to around 12 years, so make sure that if you’re in it for the long haul – just like with any other pets. Rabbits make great companions and are fantastic pets, as long as you’re willing to put in the work and show them the love they deserve.